Tag Archives: lime burning

Burning the beaches. Happy New Year from the Faroe Islands!

The Faroe Islands, in the middle of the North Atlantic Ocean. Basalt and other volcanic stone everywhere! Yet, many buildings on the islands were erected by the use of lime mortar, from the Middle Ages on. There is absolutely no limestone on the Faroes. Thus, lime mortar had to be produced by “burning the beaches” – collecting shells from beach deposits, stacking the shells above a fire in a field kiln – and let it happen: Hold the temperature at some 900 degrees centigrade for a couple of days, and out comes quicklime to be mixed with water and beach sand for the mortar. Continue reading

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HOTMIX! Nybrent Hyllestadkalk leskes og testes som restaureringsmørtel på Stavanger domkirke

Endelig i gang med hotmix! Med lesking og testing av nybrent Hyllestadkalk til bruk i mørtel for restaurering. Som mange vil huske, brant Norsk Kvernsteinsenter lokal marmor i en nybygd «middelalderovn» i Hyllestad sist juni, et prosjekt støttet av Riksantikvaren. Planen er å leske og teste brentkalken på flere restaureringsprosjekter i Norge, bl.a. på Selja klosterruiner og Stavanger domkirke. Sidene jeg regelmessig jobber sammen med kollegaer i Stavanger, har vi nå gjort flere tester på domkirken med George Murphy og Bjørn Idland, som er restaureringsmurere ved Arkeologisk Museum (UiS). Det er ikke lett å leske kalk som er brent på tradisjonell måte. For det vil alltid være halvbrente og ubrente biter i slik kalk. Akkurat som i middelalderen. Vi lesket kalken på tre ulike måter, og det var liten tvil: tradisjonell hotmix ga det foreløpig beste resultatet! Continue reading

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“Nidaros: The Portland Cement Cathedral” (Baker Memorial Lecture)

This week I attended the international conference “Rediscovering Traditional Mortars” in Trondheim. The conference was hosted by the Nidaros Cathedral Workshop and it was part of the annual conferences organised by the British Building Limes Forum and its Nordic counterpart.

I was lucky to be invited to keep two lectures, one on the experimental lime burning in Hyllestad earlier this year, and the Baker Memorial Lecture during the gala dinner. A very great honour to keep this traditional lecture for more than 230 delegates! I concentrated the lecture on the use of Portland Cement during the restoration of Nidaros Cathedral from 1869 on. Read on to get a glimpse of all the problems it has caused! Continue reading

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Experimental archaeology: Building a “classic”, intermittent limekiln and burning marble at Millstone Park, Hyllestad, Western Norway

It took us about six months: Building a cylindrical limekiln of the classic Roman/Medieval type with local materials only – stone rubble and clay. In June this year, we built the firing chamber and filled the kiln with 2.5 tons of local marble, covered the kiln with clay on a layer of spruce branches and started burning. Five days and five nights with much of the local community involved! Here’s an extended photo story of the project – the first of its kind in Norway. The quicklime (burnt marble) will be tested at Selja medieval monastery and other restoration projects in Norway. Thanks to all paid and volunteers and support from The ruin restoration programme of the Norwegian Directorate for Cultural Heritage, as well as Hyllestad Municipality! The project was carried out by The Norwegian Millstone Centre/The Museums in Sogn og Fjordane County. Continue reading

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